The future of youth offender rehabilitation: Applying the Good Lives Model to youth offenders

Dr Clare-Ann Fortune1

1Victoria University Of Wellington, Wellington, New Zealand

 

Historically, offender rehabilitation has taken a risk reduction focus. There is, however, increasing interest in expanding our understanding of effective rehabilitation approaches. The Good Lives Model (GLM) is a strength based rehabilitation framework which was developed for use with child sexual offenders. Since its development there has been increasing interest in applying it to an increasing range of offenders including youth, females, and other offender types (e.g., general, violent). This presentation will consider the application of the GLM to youth offenders including the theoretical underpinnings of its application to youth and an overview of the extant literature. Issues to consider for those using the GLM with youth offenders will also be considered including adapting the language and the GLMs fit with existing, evidence based, interventions.


Biography:

Clare-Ann Fortune, PhD, PGDipClinPsy. As a Senior Lecturer in Clinical Forensic Psychology, Clare-Ann currently teaches at undergraduate level as well as in the forensic and clinical psychology postgraduate programmes in the School of Psychology, Victoria University of Wellington. She has previously worked in research roles including with the Institute of Criminology, Faculty of Law, University College Dublin, Ireland and AUT and the University of Auckland in New Zealand. She has worked clinically in child and adolescent mental health services including for a specialist youth forensic service. She oversees the Youth Forensic Psychology Research Lab at School of Psychology, Victoria University of Wellington. The labs work focuses on three key areas of research interest: risk assessment, youth offender rehabilitation and ethical issues associated with youth forensic psychology (e.g., fitness to stand trial, young people’s understanding of their legal rights).